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20121104
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wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i think i was 12 years old. so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't really even know what that was until i actually got the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going to
-year sentence, and was immediately reduced to one year due to an amnesty law from 2006. berlusconi was also fined 10 million euros and then form -- from holding public office for 10 years. the head of the media said television empire was accused of running a complex tax evasion system in the 1990's. prosecutors said berlusconi was part of a scheme to purchase broadcast rights to film through offshore companies and then inflate the cost to reduce taxes owed. the former prime minister will remain free until italy's appeal system is exhausted, a process that could be quite lengthy. >> for more on this case, we will tend to john hooper in rome. berlusconi was sentenced to four years but apparently will only serve one year if at all. how likely is it he will serve any time? >> very unlikely indeed. the italian judicial system is one in which trials take a long time, and there are also very generous statutes of limitation that time out cases often before they have completed the process, which involved two appeals. so there is a long way to run. it is almost certain that sometime late 2013, early
-- to asia had the most liberal family status law in the arab world since 1956, and after the revolution, islamists tried to change that, and it seems they've had at least partial success. >> who is responsible for this radical turn? >> the country is a lot more democratic, but nobody should have expected that everything would work smoothly, and tunisia would be a western-style democracy in a couple of years. tunisian society is highly divided, and we only saw the relatively liberal in the capital, but most of the population is extremely conservative. they have voted the islamists into office with about 35% of the vote, and now, they are under pressure of it even more conservative and radical elements. >> how much power to the religious extremists have in tunisia, and what's the danger the power could fall into their hands? >> they are not a strong -- as strong as in egypt. the islamists are strong, and they're right wing is relatively close in its opposite -- close in its positions on this issue to the extremists, but in general, the country is divided, but most of the larger political
for law and order so they can bring aid to those affected by the conflict. the agency says more than 28,000 people have been forced out of their homes in the the latest wave of fighting. >> it's clearly urgent that law and order be restored so that violence can be prevented and so that access is facilitated for aid to be delivered to those in need. >> the latest outbreak of violence between buddhists and muslims in the state of rakine has continued since october 21st. the local government says that at least 84 people have been killed. the conflict first erupted earlier this year after a group of muslims allegedly assaulted a buddhist woman. the united nations is distributed food and emergency supplies to refugees in the area. >> the camps in and around sitwe are already hosting most of the 75,000 people who remain displaced in the wave of violence that broke out in june this year. with a new influx these already crowded camps are being stretched beyond capacity in terms of space, shelter, and basic supplies. >> meanwhile, the association of southeast asian nations is promising to respon
parliament with the fourth place finish. >> i'm sure, if not for the current election laws, we could have won a majority today. pick out the cover -- kick out the current government and formed a new coalition government. >> his party could team up with the other party of -- with the party of yulia tymoshenko. she voted from prison, under the eye of the osce election monitors. the osce slammed the elections as a step back for ukrainian democracy. >> i am joined by our correspondent inv kie -- kyev. the claim that this is a step back for the country -- what does that mean? >> the watchdogs are surprisingly clear. all the election day has been more or less calm, they say there were major violations. there was no equal playing field, no equal media access for opposition parti. the ruling party abused its power and money to manipulate. they used money to influence these elections in their favor. we have heard it before. the osce these elections a clear step backwards for the democratic process ukraine had already made. >> the ruling party looks victorious at the moment, but we have seen revitalize
sharia law in places like timbuktu, formerly a leading tourist attraction. music and alcohol are prohibited. women have to wear veils. punishments are draconian. in the capital in the south, moderate muslims set the tone, and yet, the defacto loss of 2/3 of their national territory hurts, especially since many have relatives in the north. then i i am very afraid. if we do not succeed in solving the crisis in the north, we risk having the islamists come down south. >> the crisis is very bad for my country. i would like to put an end to it at any cost. >> the country has always depended on outside assistance, and we need it now more than ever. if we were able to solve the crisis ourselves, we would have already done so. we need an external help. we cannot do it alone. >> the army is poorly trained and equipped, and the state is politically weak. the provisional government which took power after a coup in march is divided within itself. last month, the government asked the united nations for help, and the un is currently investigating the possibility of an african-led force made
laws but still made it to the top. >> his fall has weaken the party's left wing. much like the hand over power, future reforms will be decided behind closed doors. >> located near the red sea, the facility offers three master's degree programs using german educational standards. >> in the egyptian desert directly next to the resort is where you'll find the egyptian satellite campus of the technical university of berlin. the campus cost 40 million euros to build. it is the brainchild of an egyptian multimillion there. the result is the 10,000 square meter campus. students enrolled in energy engineering, urban development, and water engineering. as to the body consists of 27 men and three women from india, china, south africa and egypt. >> i want a program that is more or less a mix of here and abroad. i did not want to do two consecutive years in germany, and i'm afraid i will never come back to egypt. >> the university wants students to go home when they graduate and contribute to their country's development. this didn't come from johannesburg to study water and engineering. she wil
the law. the supreme court ruled that schools must take steps to stop this harassment. schools are required to have policies that make clear sexual harassment will not be tolerated, but that message doesn't always get through to the entire community. i think, uh, -- i think they should have some strict punishment for that, but i honestly don't know the guidelines for that. >> they should be more concerned about it and do more things about it to try to control it, 'cause it's not good and no one deserves that. >> because it's a lot more serious than people realize. >> whether you see it happen or you are a victim yourself, report it. speak to your parents, a teacher, or other trusted adult. >> i told my guidance counselor and my administrator in school, and then they talked to the people. it was dealt with. >> i would probably report it to one of my teachers, maybe one that i'm closer to. >> and, you know, you can come to a.a.u.w. and you can contact us. we're here to help people find out about their rights and when is it the time to get some help to make sure that your right to
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8